Last edited by Kezil
Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

2 edition of Combatting take-all of winter wheat in Western Oregon found in the catalog.

Combatting take-all of winter wheat in Western Oregon

Neil Walter Christensen

Combatting take-all of winter wheat in Western Oregon

by Neil Walter Christensen

  • 4 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Oregon State University Extension Service in [Corvallis Or.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Take-all disease.,
  • Wheat -- Diseases and pests -- Oregon.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementN.W. Christensen and J.M. Hart.
    SeriesEC -- 1423., Extension circular (Oregon State University. Extension Service) -- 1423.
    ContributionsHart, John M. 1947-, Oregon State University. Extension Service.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[6] p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18007770M

    The winter wheat crop of suffered somewhat from a fall freeze, and from wind and drought during the spring and if the "restlessness" of the air continued for another week, it was predicted that "this section, will be blowed away." The fears of a disastrous drought was "all a want of confidence engendered by the year of famine. This data product contains statistics on wheat—including the five classes of wheat: hard red winter, hard red spring, soft red winter, white, and durum and rye. Includes data published in the monthly Wheat Outlook and previously annual Wheat Yearbook. Data are monthly, quarterly, and/or annual, depending upon the data series.

      The winter wheat will regrow the following spring after harvesting for forage this fall. Planting winter wheat mid-summer is not generally recommended for grain production due to potential disease and insect problems. Harvest in the fall should occur approximately at the time of normal planting to allow adequate regrowth and root reserve build up. Winter wheat (usually Triticum aestivum) are strains of wheat that are planted in the autumn to germinate and develop into young plants that remain in the vegetative phase during the winter and resume growth in early spring. Classification into spring or winter wheat is common and traditionally refers to the season during which the crop is grown. For winter wheat, the physiological stage of.

      Winter wheat has considerable ability to tiller in spring, however, the best yields are obtained using higher seeding rates. Watch seeding depth A common mistake new growers make is seeding winter wheat a little too deep. Winter wheat should be seeded no more than one inch deep, as it has a shorter coleoptile than other cereals. Winter wheat is a type of cereal that is planted from September to December in the Northern Hemisphere. Winter wheat sprouts before freezing occurs, then becomes dormant until the soil warms in the spring. Winter wheat needs a few weeks of cold before being able to flower, however persistent snow cover might be disadvantageous.


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Combatting take-all of winter wheat in Western Oregon by Neil Walter Christensen Download PDF EPUB FB2

Combating Take-all of Winter Wheat in Western Oregon EC E • Revised June N.W. Christensen and J.M. Hart N.W. Christensen, professor of soil science, and J.M. Hart, Extension soil scientist; both of Oregon State University. Figure 1.—Take-all in second- third- and fourth-year wheat can reduce the stand, plant vigor, and yield.

Combatting Take-All of Winter Wheat in Western Oregon. Combatting Take-All of Winter Wheat in Western Oregon. Neil W. Christensen; John M. Hart; Twitter Facebook. Identifies factors that influence take-all and offers management practices to minimize yield losses.

Damage is severe in western Oregon and Washington and in irrigated areas of central and eastern Oregon. It also can be serious in extreme northern Idaho and throughout the irrigated Snake River Plains. J.M. Combating Take-all Root Rot of Winter Wheat in Western Oregon.

Publication EC E. Oregon State University Extension Service. Combating take-all root rot of winter wheat in western Oregon Public Deposited Oregon State University.

Agricultural Experiment Station; Series: Fact sheet (Oregon State University. Extension Service) Subject: Take-all disease -- Control -- Oregon; Wheat root rots -- Control -- Oregon; Gaeumannomyces graminis -- Control -- Oregon; Wheat Author: T.

Jackson, R. Powelson, Neil Walter Christensen. Combating take-all root rot of winter wheat in western Oregon. Download PDF (47 KB) Oregon, Wheat root rots -- Control -- Oregon.

Publisher: Corvallis, Or.: Extension Service, Oregon State University Combating take-all root rot of winter wheat in western Oregon. Combating Take-All Root Rot of Winter Wheat in Western Oregon STATE Take-all root rot of wheat (Gaeumannomyces gra minis var.

tritici) has increased in western Oregon with the in-creased wheat acreage and frequency of wheat in the rota-tion. Take-all produces a black, infected root system and lower stem; plants may be stunted and yellow, and may.

Take-all disease of wheat is caused by the soilborne fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt). This disease infects the roots, crown, and basal stem of plants.

Take-all is common in western Oregon whenever consecutive crops of wheat are grown. Grain yield may be reduced by as much as 50 percent in second or third crops of winter wheat.

Soft White Winter Wheat (Western Oregon), Oregon State University, Using Seed Moisture as a Harvest Management Tool, Oregon State University, Combatting Take-All of Winter Wheat in Western Oregon, Oregon State University, Nitrogen Management for Hard Wheat Protein Enhancement, Oregon State University, Combatting Take-All of Winter Wheat in Western Oregon Identifies factors that influence take-all and offers management practices to minimize yield losses.

Jun | OSU Extension Catalog. Oregon Research Take-all Root Rot in Winter Wheat By John M. Hart and Neil W. Christensen Researchers have developed a package of best management practices for high (BMPs) yield wheat production in western Oregon.

A major problem with wheat following wheat in the area is take-all root rot which can reduce yields as much as 50 percent. The BMPs. Combatting Take-All Root Rot of Winter Wheat in Western Oregon, ECby N.W. Christensen and J.M Hart (). 75¢ To order copies of the above publications, send the complete title and series number, along with a check or money order for the amount listed (payable to Oregon State University), to: Publication Orders Extension & Station.

Severity of take‐all root rot (caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici) of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) has been decreased in the Willamette Valley of western Oregon by applying Cl containing fertilizers.

Apparent increases in leaf turgor of field grown wheat following spring topdressing with NH 4 Cl fertilizer suggested that Cl salts affect plant water potential components. Since winter wheat tends to tiller more profusely than spring wheat, million seeds per acre is the upper end of the recommended seeding rate.

Excessively high seeding rates can result in more lodging by harvest time, particularly if you are using a taller variety (like Jerry). South Dakota farmers who are aiming for higher yields typically.

Nutrient Management Guide: Soft White Winter Wheat. Nitrogen Mineralization Soil Test for Winter Wheat. N-Min Frequently Asked Questions; Evaluating Soil Nutrients and pH by depth in Situations of Limited or No Tillage.

Combating Take-All of Winter Wheat in Western Oregon. Growing Winter Wheat on Poorly Drained Soil. Soil Test Interpretation Guide. Why Breed Wheat at OSU. Wheat represents one of the most important global sources of vegetable-based protein. As one of the top ten commodity crops in Oregon, wheat breeding must produce high quality varieties adapted to environments in both western and eastern Oregon.

Oregon provides a unique opportunity to breed wheat adapted to multiple environments with high disease. Combatting take-all of winter wheat in western Oregon and take-all root rot of winter wheat grown in the field were measured concurrently from sowing to anthesis in order to relate disease.

Station Wheat Information The station plants several types of small grains each year. Different varieties of soft white wheat (winter and spring), hard red wheat and hard white wheat.

New varieties are being developed by university, USDA, and private breeding programs. In Oregon, new varieties are evaluated in the Oregon State University State Wide Variety Trial, testing them.

Winter wheat works well in mixtures with other small grains or with legumes such as hairy vetch. It is an excellent nurse crop for frostseeding red clover or sweetclover, if rainfall is sufficient. In the Corn Belt, the legume is usually sown in winter, before wheat’s vegetative growth resumes.

Winter wheat is an excellent cool-season forage for white-tailed deer. Healthy, green, growing wheat contains more than 20 percent crude protein, and with less than 25 percent acid detergent fiber it is highly digestible.

Forage yield is commonly 4, to 6, lbs./acre from October through March, and wheat is a relatively high-preference forage of white-tailed deer. In Read More. Using the nitrogen mineralization soil test to predict spring fertilizer N rate: soft white winter wheat grown in western Oregon Article January with 13 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Winter wheat is a variety of wheat planted in the fall and harvested the following spring. It develops vegetative growth prior to winter, vernalizes, and then develops a grain crop in the spring.

Typically planted from September to November in the Upper Midwest, winter wheat is often harvested as a cash crop or used as a cover crop. Its advantages as a cover crop include helping prevent soil.

Winter Wheat Emergence: Threshold Indicator A threshold indicator for winter wheat emergence is to consider average temperatures over a day period.

When that day average temperature is equal to or above five degrees C, or 41° F, then hard red winter wheat can break dormancy. Historically in South Dakota, this threshold is met in the.Read, borrow, and discover more than 3M books for free.

Donate Combating take-all root rot of winter wheat in western Oregon T. L. JacksonPacific Northwest, Eastern Oregon, Pacific Coast, Western Oregon, Willamette River Valley, Newport, Newport (Or.).