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1 edition of Phase distributions of low volatility organics in ambient air found in the catalog.

Phase distributions of low volatility organics in ambient air

Phase distributions of low volatility organics in ambient air

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Published by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Atmospheric Sciences Research Laboratory in Research Triangle Park, NC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Organic compounds -- Environmental aspects

  • Edition Notes

    StatementBruce K. Cantrell ... [et al.]
    ContributionsCantrell, Bruce K, Atmospheric Sciences Research Laboratory
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[2] ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14891679M

    Class II: Organlcs with intermediate phase distribution in ambient air (1 x 10"®atm vapor pressure 1 x 10"^ atm), and organlcs for which volatility or phase distribution evidence does not exist. 14 9 II Q IS 17 19 21 23 25 27 10 7 H 1# «20 22 24 28 n C - numbtr at n ¦ alkrjnn —«SOURCE: EICHMANN. «t ll. () Figure 7. OH to form low volatility organic acids (glyoxylic and oxalic acids). Upon cloud evaporation these organics remain mostly (i.e., 75% and 90%, respectively) in the particle phase [Limbeck et al., ], forming SOA. The key difference between the chemistry used in the Lim and Ervens models is the aqueous‐phase fate of pyruvic acid.

    Volatile (vapour-phase) organic ‘air toxics’, also known as ‘hazardous air pollutants’ (HAPs), are monitored in many industrial and urban environments as a measure of air quality. They range in volatility from methyl chloride and propene to hexachlorobutadiene and the trichlorobenzenes, and include polar as well as non-polar compounds. In the framework of classical nucleation theory (CNT), we demonstrate that an ensemble of aqueous hydrophilic–hydrophobic organic droplets, containing both soluble and insoluble surfactants and evolving via concurrent condensation and chemical aging, may deplete the surrounding air of low-volatility organic trace gases and thus noticeably decrease their Author: Yuri S. Djikaev, Eli Ruckenstein.

    Volatility (chemistry) In [1]chemistry and physics, volatility is a term used to characterize the tendency of a substance to vaporize. At a given temperature, a substance with a higher vapor pressure will vaporize more readily than a substance with a lower vapor Size: KB. Simulating the oxygen content of ambient organic aerosol with the 2D volatility basis set B. N. Murphy1, N composition and volatility distribution of OA. Using the ). Thermodenuder studies have found OA in the field to be quite low in volatility, also indicative of exten-sive oxidation and addition of polarizing functional groups.


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Phase distributions of low volatility organics in ambient air Download PDF EPUB FB2

United States Environmental Protection Agency Atmospheric Sciences Research Laboratory Research Triangle Park IMC Research and Development EPA//S/ Mar. &EPA Project Summary Phase Distributions of Low Volatilty Organics in Ambient Air Bruce K.

Cantrell, Louis J Salas, Warren B. Johnson, and James C Harper Current strategies to control photo- chemical air. Get this from a library. Phase distributions of low volatility organics in ambient air.

[Bruce K Cantrell; Atmospheric Sciences Research Laboratory.;]. During the summer and fall of in Riverside, California, the seasonal volatility behavior of submicrometer aerosol particles was investigated by coupling an automated thermodenuder system to an online single-particle mass spectrometer.

A strong seasonal dependence was observed for the gas/particle partitioning of alkylamines within individual ambient submicrometer aged organic Cited by:   Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are a large source of uncertainty in our current understanding of climate change and air pollution.

The phase state of SOA is important for quantifying their Cited by:   Bertram AK, Martin ST, Hanna SJ, Smith ML, Bodsworth A, Chen Q, Kuwata M, Liu A, You Y, Zorn SR () Predicting the relative humidities of liquid-liquid phase separation, efflorescence, and deliquescence of mixed particles of ammonium sulfate, organic material, and water using the organic-to-sulfate mass ratio of the particle and the oxygen-to-carbon elemental ratio of the organic Cited by: Data analysis The vapor-phase and particle-bound levels of each target compound and the estimated sampling artifact levels were calculated using the following equations: FXno = P + V, (1) FXd = P, (2) Con~:entrations and phase distributions of nitrated and oxygenated PAH ambient air Table by: The concentrations of nitrated and oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in ambient air, both in the vapor phase and adsorbed on airborne particles, were measured over a.

phase organics in equilibrium with the OA could range from ∼20% to % of the OA mass, with smaller values gener-ally corresponding to the higher 1Hvap assumptions. The volatility of various OA components determined from fac-tor analysis of AMS spectra has also been assessed.

In general, it is found that the fraction of non-volatile mate. We found that even when gas phase organics are removed, it takes ∼24 h for pure α-pinene SOA particles to evaporate 75% of their mass, which is in sharp contrast to the ∼10 min time scale predicted by current kinetic by: Recent experimental evidence has clearly indicated the low volatility of ambient SOA particles [Vaden et al., ], role of condensed‐phase processes in the formation of low‐volatility oligomers [e.g., Shiraiwa et al., ], and identified rapid formation of extremely low volatility species (ELVOCs) during oxidation of biogenic VOCs [Ehn Cited by: (SMPS), were combined to investigate the volatility of or-ganic aerosol in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Fi-nokalia Aerosol Measurement Experiment– (FAME).

A new data analysis method, which addresses the challenges of ambient TD-AMS measurements, is applied for the quantification of the organic aerosol volatility by:   After the signals reached steady-state behavior, we conducted experiments where synthetic air, normally used as carrier gas, was substituted by a N 2-rich carrier gas.

The substantial decrease in the O 2 concentration (1/60 O 2 content of ambient air) reduced ELVOC production dramatically for all of the studied terpenes (Fig. 1 and SI Appendix Cited by:   Highly oxygenated organic molecules (HOMs) are formed from the oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic gases and affect Earth’s climate and air quality by their key role in particle formation and growth.

While the formation of these molecules in the gas phase has been extensively studied, the complexity of organic aerosol (OA) and lack of suitable measurement Author: V. Pospisilova, F. Lopez-Hilfiker, D.

Bell, I. El Haddad, C. Mohr, W. Huang, L. Heikkinen, M. Aqueous‐phase oxidation may produce such OA, but experiments under realistic ambient conditions are needed to constrain the relative importance of this pathway. 1 Introduction Organic aerosol (OA) is an important, sometimes dominant, component of submicron particle mass in the troposphere [ Zhang et al., ].Cited by: Saturation Vapor Pressures and Transition Enthalpies of Low-Volatility Organic Molecules of Atmospheric Relevance: From Dicarboxylic Acids to Complex Mixtures.

Chemical Reviews(10), DOI: /cr Lap P. Chan, Alex K. Lee and Chak K. Chan. Organic aerosols (OA) comprise 20–90% of atmospheric dry particles mass, the majority and least understood of which is secondary organic aerosol (SOA), formed from oxidation of gas phase organic vapors in the atmosphere (3 –6).Cited by:   Chemical composition of aerosols sampled in the boreal forest.

a Ambient observations of the relative intensity of organic fragments with > m/z 85 Th as a function of NH 4:SO 4 molar ratio. Marker Cited by: 9. DEA was present in the particle phase with an average concentration of ng m-3, but was not detected in the gas phase.

Sea to air fluxes for MMA and DMA were calculated from the seawater and. Ambient temperature and wind speed were found to significantly affect the size distribution of particles. Most organic compounds exhibited highest proportions in particle size fraction Cited by: THE EXTRACTION OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANICS FROM LIQUIDS MARTHA J.

WELLS Center for the Management, Utilization and Protection of Water Resources and Department of Chemistry, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee PRINCIPLES OF EXTRACTION This chapter focuses on three widely used techniques for extraction of semi.

Fig. 1. (A) Volatility distribution of 1 st-generation α-pinene ozonolysis products vs saturation concentration (C ∗).Filled green bars indicate the condensed-phase and white bars the vapor-phase concentrations. The green arrow shows the total condensed-phase concentration (C ∗ = C OA = 66 μg m-3).Compounds with this saturation concentration will be Cited by: Review of low-cost sensors for the ambient air monitoring of benzene and other volatile organic compounds.

Spinelle L., Gerboles M., Kok G. and Sauerwald T. EUR This publication is a Technical report by the Joint Research .Gas-to-particle partitioning of organic aerosols (OA) is represented in most models by Raoult's law, and depends on the existing mass of particles into which organic gases can dissolve.

This raises the possibility of non-linear response of particle-phase OA mass to the emissions of precursor volatile organic Chemistry in the Urban AtmosphereCited by: 1.